About

Since its original foundation in 1976, Sullivan Design has gone through a number of changes both in terms of style and direction. Over the last 39 years, Sullivan Design has worked on more than 1,200 projects for over 400 clients. The company offers a specialised service in providing solutions to problems for food factory developments for prepared salads and vegetables, fish and sea food processing, meat processing, beverage, bakeries, dairies, chocolate and confectionery and snack foods. Services on offer include, freezing, chilling, high care low risk separation, product and personnel flows.

In order to do this, the remit often includes site surveys and reports, feasibility studies, budgeting, detailed designs, production of CAD layouts, room data sheets, specifications, project management and commissioning management.

Factory engineering services must incorporate common levels of quality, simplicity and reliability. Designers must consider safety for product and personnel; hygiene risks, environmental issues, operational and maintenance requirements together with flexibility to adapt to newly emerging needs. Our team of professionals not only draw on their specific engineering expertise, but also maintain specialist knowledge of regulations and guides. Reference and association is made with agencies such as Campden & Chorleywood Food Research Association, Chilled Food Association, DEFRA together with keeping abreast with processing developments through various trade magazines.

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Sullivan Design is based in the grounds of Hagley Hall. The family home of the Viscounts Cobham for over 250 years, Hagley Hall is a Palladian mansion built by gentleman architect Sanderson Miller for the 1st Lord Lyttelton from 1754-1760. It is built of pink sandstone, to a rectangular plan with four corner towers, and the house is set on a low rise, giving broad views over rolling countryside. It was built to grace the 350 acres of undulating parkland that he and his father landscaped in the ‘Picturesque’ style from the mid-eighteenth century, and which is peppered with follies and features including the Temple of Theseus designed by James ‘Athenian’ Stuart, which became a model for the Doric order of Greek revival architecture.